Need a Military Law Lawyer?

If you are on active duty, there are numerous issues that can call for the assistance of an attorney. The most significant situations usually concern charges brought by a command under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). Commanders often choose to “prefer” charges against a soldier, sailor, airman or marine and, in certain circumstances, those or other charges are “referred” by a commander for a court martial. Those charges most likely come from of the punitive articles listed in the UCMJ. An attorney can play a vital role in the defense of a case even before charges are preferred by a command.

Is There Any Protection Under Military Law Against Cruelty and Maltreatment?

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Quite often an individual's perception of a simple assault can be quite misleading. In respect to military law, there are three areas addressed by this offence. These are by offer, by attempt, or by battery. By having a basic understanding of these three areas, individuals might think twice before acting out and landing themselves into trouble.

By Offer: If an individual thinks that something that someone is doing, or not doing, is going to mean having some type of force applied against him, then this is an assault by offer. This holds true only if the person is led to believe this by the intention or negligence of the other person. In order for the offense to have been committed it does not mean that the act suspected by the individual is even carried out. In this case, it is definitely the thought that counts.

So really, what constitutes leading one to believe that they are going to be physically harmed? To begin with, the actions leading one to believe they are in harm's way do not have to be factual. For example, if one person points an unloaded gun at another, and the person the gun is being pointed at was under the belief that the gun was loaded, then the person with the gun has committed assault even if he was only joking.

If the victim really knows that no harm is intended then this is not assault by offer. The victim's perspective that he really is being threatened with harm must be a reasonable perception.

Assault by attempt: Threatening words or threats of harm being eminent in the future are not considered assault. There has to be something to lead one to believe that they are going to suffer bodily harm. For example, if someone was to strike out at a victim, but they were not within distance of contact, it would still be assault because the potential to inflict harm was there. One would think that based on this, if an individual were to fire a pistol over another person's head, the shooter would be charged. If there was no intent to cause harm then this would not be the case.

Assault by Battery: The most commonly understood aspect of assault is that where force or violence is carried out by one party on another. It goes further than that, though. Even offensive touching can be presumed as an assault. For example, kissing someone that did not give their permission. There have even been examples of unnecessary exposure to radiation being classed as sufficient physical touching.

Sometimes knowing a little about the law can be more detrimental than knowing nothing at all. Many individuals who thought they knew what assault was had no idea that when charged with an offense, the act they carried out came under such an area of the law as assault.

Is There Any Protection Under Military Law Against Cruelty and Maltreatment?

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If charges are brought before a court martial panel, the service member faces a daunting task. Having the right attorney representing the service member is critical.

If convicted at court martial, a panel can consider a number of options for punishment. If the panel decides to separate the service member from the armed forces, a service member can receive 1 of 5 possible types of discharge: Honorable, Under Honorable Conditions (often called a “General Discharge”), Under Other than Honorable Conditions, Bad-Conduct Discharge, or Dishonorable Discharge. The last 2 of this list, Bad-Conduct Discharge, or Dishonorable Discharge, can only be given after a conviction at court martial. Whether a service member will retain various benefits, including VA benefits, his/her Montgomery GI bill, or even his/her retirement, hinges greatly on the characterization of discharge.

Another form of discharge is uncharacterized. An uncharacterized “Entry Level Separation” typically is granted in situations when a service member is in his/her first 180 days in the service and is not adjusting well to the military lifestyle.

An alternative to bringing a service member to court martial is bringing the service member before an administrative board. There are many boards in the various service branches. Some are convened to determine whether the service member has committed misconduct sufficient to be separated (essentially fired) from the service branch. Other boards are convened to determine whether an injury is severe enough to prohibit continued service by a service member. Officers who are suspected of misconduct might be brought before a board of officers or a board of inquiry. Experienced representation before administrative boards is critical to a service member’s success or failure.

Reservists often times encounter as many legal issues as their active duty brethren. Many times a reservist receives orders activating the service member to duty. The orders may have been issued erroneously. However, disregarding those orders can create its own set of issues. Alternatively, some reservists find that reporting for active duty may cause a devastating impact on their families and civilian lives. Consulting with the right, experienced attorney is important in determining what a service member’s rights and obligations are.

Some reservists encounter issues with their civilian bosses before leaving for an activation or deployment or when they return from one. Federal laws such as the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) help protect service members who face these problems. Our lawyers help navigate these difficult issues. A service member has enough to think about when deployment orders are issued – this should not be one of them.

Many veterans and ex-service members attempt to correct their military records. However, the process can be confusing and paralyzing. We can help you prepare your application before the Army Board of Correction of Military Records (ABCMR), Air Force Board of Correction of Military Records (AFBCMR), and the Board of Correction of Naval Records (BCNR).

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Military Divorce Lawyers

If you, your spouse, or both of you are in the military and have decided to divorce, you should use the services of military divorce lawyers. The reason is that a military divorce can be a very complicated legal matter that requires the knowledge of this type of lawyer. Although this type of divorce will follow the same procedures as a regular civilian divorce there are some intricacies that are different. These include retirement and military benefits, living arrangements that have to be dealt with separately, and the serving of divorce papers. Because civilian divorce lawyers do not understand the military laws that surround a military divorce is why you would need such a lawyer.

The military uses the same legal system as the civilian divorce proceeding do so there are no military judges or military divorce courts. There is one rule that is different in military divorces that is not in civilian divorces. Across the United States in most jurisdictions, the serving of divorce papers have to be made in person and within a certain amount of time but it is different with a military divorce. There are laws that will protect the member of the military if there is an unusual delay in the proceeding because they are not able to be served the papers or to attend the proceedings because of active duty.

To become such a lawyer you should know the particulars of all applicable federal and state laws that could apply to any divorce. State laws govern most divorces but with military divorces this is not entirely true. In regards to pensions, custody of children, military benefits, retirement, and child support or alimony there are some federal laws that will trump state laws. In rare cases, there are some portions of the hearing that may need to be heard by federal judges. If one or both members involved in the divorce are stationed overseas, there could be additional issues that pop up.

For military lawyers they do not need to be a member of any branch of the military. They are lawyers that specialize in divorce, specifically military divorce. To become a military lawyer you need to have a bachelor's degree, a Juris Doctorate (J.D.) from a law school that is accredited, and pass the Bar Association examination. You will also need experience working as a divorce attorney or have a job working with a law firm that specializes in divorce. The last thing you need is an understanding of all issues that are involved with a military divorce.
To be admitted to a good law school you have to have had a high grade point average throughout your bachelor degree program and pass the admissions test